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Category Archives: Documentary

50 Days

2019; 16m

Short documentary that tells the story of the Chicago Hotel Workers strike, from the strike vote to the settlement with the last major hotel chain

Eve Saxon
eve@answersmediainc.com
312 209.1208

WEBSITE

Trailer

 

The Price of Free (Kailash)

Kailash (original title)

1h 32min | Documentary | 2 November 2018 (USA)

The story of how Kailash Satyarthi launched a built a global movement to rescue children from slavery.

WEBSITE

Entire film available online here

Initial releaseJanuary 18, 2018
 

Docs & the World

Barcelona blog devoted to social and environmental documentaries.

“We have just started a series of posts about films that deal with the question of work in capitalism. We think these films can help to build up the working class conscience so sorely needed nowadays. Unless there is a new, global working class consciousness, underprivileged classes (increasingly extended) are doomed to be crushed by the sheer destructive power of capitalism. With this post we begin an overview of documentary and fiction films that can help to build up, through denunciation and example, that conscience and solidarity more needed than ever.”

Joan Sole
 

Bitter Money

2016 ‧ Documentary ‧ 2h 43m

Migrants come to the city of East China looking for a better life, but instead find few opportunities and poor living conditions that create violence and oppression.

Initial release: September 9, 2016
Director: Wang Bing
Screenplay: Wang Bing
Cast: Ling Ling, Huang Lei
Awards: Orizzonti Award for Best Screenplay
Nominations: Orizzonti Award for Best Actor, Orizzonti Award for Best Actress

‘Bitter Money’ and ‘Bitter Rice’: Migrant Workers Face Toil and Trouble

 

The Great Strike 1917

Trailer
70 minutes.

Documentary about events which shaped Australian society and the labor movement for a century and beyond.

Synopsis
Thousands had stopped work, the government recruited volunteers to break the strike, allowing them to bear arms; unions were deregistered and union leaders charged with conspiracy. It was a time of violent emotions, state violence and individual acts of violence by and against strikers. A striker was shot and killed. A filmmaker had his film embargoed. It was Sydney, 1917.

The world was in the grip of “The Great War”. Rail and tram employees had been forced to work longer hours, with reduced wages and conditions. With the introduction of a new American ‘timecard’ system, tramway and railway workers in inner Sydney walked off the job in protest, triggering the strike.

The stoppage became the biggest industrial upheaval Australia has seen before or since. At its height the strike stopped coastal shipping, mining, stevedoring and transport, and involved tens of thousands of workers in Australia’s eastern states.

Despite being a crushing defeat at the time, it had lasting consequences for the Australian labor movement. It was 100 years ago, but personal stories rarely spoken about were to filter through, reflecting on both the trauma and the positive legacy of the event, which still strongly resonate today.

WEBSITE

Mandy King
cavadini@tpg.com.au
M: 0410 633 503

 

Nightcaller

Director: Alexander Humilde
2018; 6m

“In the urban jungle of Manila, the call centre capital of the world, anonymous call centre agents from Manila spill the beans on the Philippines’ most in-demand job. Their stories reveal prevalent truths about the effects of rapid westernization, all of which take place just on the other side of our phone calls.”

Alexander Humilde’s Nightcaller documentary debuts on Air Canada flights

 

Murder Not Accident

Screener (need password)

2019; video; 30m
Directed by Fatih Pınar, edited by Burcu Kolbay and Fatih Pınar
Co-produced by Bergen Assembly 2019

Contact: Fatih Pınar; fatihpinara@gmail.com
Screened at 2019 labor film festival in Turkey

Murder Not Accident documents the collective struggle against the “work-related serial murders” in Turkey. In 2018, at least 1,872 people died on the job due to preventable causes while working. The annual death toll of occupational diseases is estimated to be at least six times this figure. None of these deaths are registered as work-related and most of the victims of work-related violence remain unnamed. This is a state of emergency – corporate crime and social murder, which remain deliberately ignored by the government and state entities.

In 2008, a group of families mourning for loved ones, victims of work-related murders, came together. They translated their shared grief into a demand for justice. They named their network Workers’ Families Seeking Justice (WFSJ) and gave the victims a name with this struggle:

We are the families of the workers who lost their lives in preventable work-related accidents and occupational diseases, the root reasons of which are duplicated in each new death. That is why we call them “work-related murders”. Those who are responsible for them –highest-ranking executives and officials of corporations and public bodies– were never exposed to a just judicial process and continue to enjoy full impunity. We are mourning together and our claim for justice is to “remember the dead and fight for the living”.

The Support Group, a solidarity network of urban planners, architects, lawyers, and other activists from Bir Umut Derneği (One Hope Association), based in Istanbul, share a common cause with the Workers’ Families. Since May 2012, on the first Sunday of each month, the Families and the Support Group have been holding “the Vigil for Conscience and Justice” on Galatasaray Square in the center of Istanbul. The vigils were held there 74 times and were banned on the 75th occasion. The reasons given for the ban were the precise ones for which the families have fought for so long: “national security, public order, the protection of public health”.

Yet Workers’ Families Seeking Justice hold on to their demand. Concurrently, since 2012, the Support Group has published seven almanacs about the murders, tracing the national press coverage and some local, non-published sources as well as highlighting the families’ demand for memory and justice.