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Category Archives: Safety & Health

Gold Fever (2013)

J.T. Haines, Tommy Haines & Andrew Sherburne, co-directors
84 min | Documentary, Drama | 13 April 2013 (USA)
http://www.goldfevermovie.com/
productions@northlandfilms.com

Gold, an obsession of men and nations; a symbol of wealth and power. But for Diodora, Gregoria, Crisanta and the people living near the Marlin Mine in Guatemala’s highlands, gold represents oppression, intimidation, pollution and even murder. With the rising price of gold, the mine’s owner, Goldcorp, posts record profits, while these courageous women live in resistance to the mine’s unstoppable hunger.

 

Cast in India (2014)

26 min, USA/India, 2014
Dir. Natasha Raheja

Iconic and ubiquitous, thousands of manhole covers dot the streets of New York City. Enlivening the everyday objects around us, this short film is a glimpse of the working lives of the men behind the manhole covers in New York City.

https://vimeo.com/95178509

Natasha Suresh Raheja nraheja@nyu.edu

 

Traceable (2014)

http://raindancefestival.org/features-2014/traceable/

This documentary examines the fashion industry process, and its conscience, from a designers’ perspective.

This environmental documentary has a powerful ethical story to tell and makes even the most exhausted eye-rollers sit up and listen.

The 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Bangladesh put faces on the term ‘garment factory workers’. With this as a backdrop, ‘Traceable’ looks at the local communities behind clothing industries that have retained distinctive crafts for generations. ‘Traceability’ is the aim to have a proper trail for every single step in the supply chain. As well as where, it wants consumers to be concerned with how garments are made. Thousands of hands in the process go untraceable because many farmers, seamstresses and printers simply do not have the technology to be contacted by email or phone.

Director Jennifer Sharpe follows Laura Seigel, a young designer fighting to connect the design world with anonymous artisans. Most designers do not have the time or enough commitment to nurture a direct relationship with the people who make their clothes. This documentary is partly anthropological, as Seigel designs with the creators hand-to-hand and negotiates with them on their own turf. Without being patronising or naive, ‘Traceable’ captures equal and harmonious working partnerships.

 

Sherpa (2015)

96 min  |  Documentary  |  2 October 2015 (USA)

Director/writer: Jennifer Peedom

A fight on Everest? It seemed incredible. But in 2013 news channels around the world reported an ugly brawl at 21,000ft as European climbers fled a mob of angry Sherpas. In 1953, New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay had reached the summit in a spirit of co-operation and brave optimism. Now climbers and Sherpas were trading insults – even blows. What had happened to the happy, smiling Sherpas and their dedication in getting foreigners to the top of the mountain they hold so sacred? Determined to explore what was going on, the filmmakers set out to make a film of the 2014 Everest climbing season, from the Sherpas’ point of view. Instead, they captured a tragedy that would change Everest forever. At 6.45am on 18th April, 2014, a 14 million ton block of ice crashed down onto the climbing route through the Khumbu Icefall, killing 16 Sherpas. It was the worst tragedy in the history of Everest. The disaster provoked a drastic reappraisal about the role of the Sherpas in the Everest industry. SHERPA, tells the story of how, in the face of fierce opposition, the Sherpas united in grief and anger to reclaim the mountain they call Chomolungma.

‘Sherpa’ Delves Into a Risky Profession The documentary makers, who were at Mount Everest when 16 sherpas died in an ice avalanche in 2014, explore the tensions between these guides and their wealthy clients.

 

The Gold Of Faso (2015)

Filmmaker: Dragoss Ouedraogo

Burkina Faso | 2015 | Documentary | 62 minutes

Since 2009, Burkina Faso knows a situation of “mining boom” after a campaign of geological exploration and an incitement of foreigner investments. But thanks to a favourable mining code and a discriminatory legislation, this “mining boom” looks like a huge operation of looting the resources of the country, enriching the managers of this network and droping the populations loosing their grounds.

The Gold of Faso does not shine for every body and the anger grows.
2015 Brazilian International Labour Film Festival

 

Still the Enemy Within (AKA “The Enemy Within”)

2014 * Documentary * England * 112 minutes
Director/writer: Owen Gower
Sinead Kirwan, Producer: sinead.kirwan@bad-bonobo.com
Tel: 00447914412037 or 004915902169012
Skype: sineadrk
Follow us on Twitter @enemywithin1984
http://www.facebook.com/stilltheenemywithin

This riveting documentary revisits the front lines of one of the most bitterly fought strikes of the late 20th century—the 1984-1985 British Miners’ Strike. Told from the perspectives of the miners, their families and supporters, it incorporates rarely used archival footage with interviews, providing fresh insights to a dramatic, brutal, and heartbreaking yet inspiring struggle. Thirty years after the strike to prevent mine closures and the decimation of miners’ communities, Still the Enemy Within is a compelling reminder of everyday people’s power through organization and collective action—and the limitations when confronted by the force of the Thatcher administration and the British government.

 

The Forgotten Space

112 mins; 2010
By Allan Sekula and Noël Burch
Film website

Investigates global maritime trade, highlighting displaced farmers and villagers in Holland, underpaid truck drivers in Los Angeles and Filipino maids in China. Sekula and Burch offer a sobering portrait of workers’ conditions, the inhuman scale of sea trade and the secret lives of port cities.

 

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Empire of Shame

Director – Hong Li-gyeong (92 min) 2013, Korea

Empire of Shame is about the struggle of Samsung workers to defend their health and safety and get compensation from the company. The corporation refused to admit that workers were getting cancer from the chemicals and toxins that were used in the plants.

A total of 193 employees have applied for workers compensation for industrial diseases and 73 of these workers have already lost their lives to disease.

Workers are required to give direct proof of a casual link between their duties and their sickness. This makes it extremely difficult for worker who are very sick to get the treatment they need.

This film shows the struggle to get to the truth and to defend the health and safety of the workers.

http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_entertainment/624867.html

 

High Power

(27 min) by Pradeep Indulkar, India

This powerful film is about the lives of workers and the community at the Tarapur nuclear power plant, which was built fifty years ago in a poor rural community. Like other nuclear power plants around the world, people in the community were displaced and provided no real compensation but they were promised good jobs.

This, like the other promises according to the people of Tarapur, turned out to be a lie. They also become the victims of diseases directly caused by radiation and other toxins brought into their community by the plant

Their community, their lives and their work turn into a nightmare they are struggling against as are communities where nuclear plants have been built.

 

ASOTRECOL, The Struggle Against Transnationals in Colombia

(55 min.) 2013, Colombia
With tactics ranging from hunger strikes with lips stitched shut to a nearly 1,000-day sit-in at the U.S. Embassy, Colombian workers are putting the world’s attention on General Motors’ treatment of its workers. This film tells the incredible story of an association of injured workers who have taken on one of the most powerful corporations in the world, and have won victories they never thought were possible. The Obama administration pushed the US Colombian trade agreement with the argument that it would protect the workers of Colombia from assassinations and repression because of labor protections. Since the agreement was passed by the Congress and signed by President Obama the repression continues and US corporations like GM and Coca-Cola continue to injure and terrorize Colombian workers.

Injured workers from Asotrecol have also come to the United States to the headquarters of General Motors to demand justice and have not received justice. The UAW which owned shares in General Motors have also been silent about the treatment of the Colombian GM workers and the struggle continues.